Tag Archives: environmental design

DESIGN + FUNCTION | Pentagram Clears Up New York City’s Parking Signs

47579029-media_httpcdntheatlan_IDmsbI love these types of projects — taking something we all encounter every day (and that doesn’t quite work) and using the basics of good design to improve our experience.

Pentagram has successfully provided clarity to New York City’s essay-length parking signage. They balanced the mix of color, font, and visual hierarchy to create a more pleasant layout for previously confused parkers.

Pentagram’s Michael Bierut – on one of the earlier design iterations:
“They looked really beautiful, really modern…But somehow they didn’t look like parking signs in a way. They didn’t have that aura of authority.”

I don’t know about you, but, driving through my own city, I can think of a few signs I would like to take a crack at re-imagining…

*camille

 
(Before)
Anatomy of a Parking Sign That Actually Makes Sense
(After)

ARCHITECTURE + GRAPHICS | Pajol Kindergarten – France

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I’m a sucker for interesting, bold, and not-too-kiddie environmental graphics in schools. This project, for an elementary school in France, fits the bill on all fronts.

The dynamic stripes of color are wonderfully integrated throughout the school – in both interior and exterior applications. Click the link above to see the original post (and additional images) by Graphic Ambient. The best part of the project may be the fact that the school is like a candy-colored oasis in the middle of a dirt-filled construction zone.

I can’t speak to whether the classroom spaces function in an optimal way, but, regardless, I find this to be an example of the the unique design touches that can add a bit of oomph to educational facilities. Good stuff!

*camille

(H/t David Airey)

PRINT + GRAPHICS | Sundance Film Festival

Sundance Poster

The 2012 Sundance Film Festival features graphics designed by Pentagram. As with most events of this type, the design standards were used for everything from print materials to environmental graphics to merchandise.

I appreciate the way in which the ‘motif’ (for lack of a better word) was effectively used in the film catalog – incorporating the fragmented aesthetic into limited areas of the book. And, I think the overall concept made for some interesting design opportunities throughout the different media.

*camille