Tag Archives: typography

COLOR + ILLUSTRATION | Colorful and Retro-esque Posters by Neil Stevens

Neil Stevens posters

Images via Allan Peters

Quick post: The venerable Allan Peters had Neil Stevens’ work posted at his site and I thought I would share it here too. Stevens’ colorful posters are minimalist, but each thoughtful details and a color palette that brings the concept to life.

Below are a few samples, but many more images can be found at the link!

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https://i2.wp.com/allanpeters.com/wp-content/uploads/caa28a35cba719a6c48d913dd318aa45.jpg

https://i1.wp.com/allanpeters.com/wp-content/uploads/19a5df12148bbc124520ff803a588294.jpg

https://i0.wp.com/allanpeters.com/wp-content/uploads/400cbab950aaa9594fe482dad22497f7.jpg

*camille

 

 

DESIGN + FUNCTION | Pentagram Clears Up New York City’s Parking Signs

47579029-media_httpcdntheatlan_IDmsbI love these types of projects — taking something we all encounter every day (and that doesn’t quite work) and using the basics of good design to improve our experience.

Pentagram has successfully provided clarity to New York City’s essay-length parking signage. They balanced the mix of color, font, and visual hierarchy to create a more pleasant layout for previously confused parkers.

Pentagram’s Michael Bierut – on one of the earlier design iterations:
“They looked really beautiful, really modern…But somehow they didn’t look like parking signs in a way. They didn’t have that aura of authority.”

I don’t know about you, but, driving through my own city, I can think of a few signs I would like to take a crack at re-imagining…

*camille

 
(Before)
Anatomy of a Parking Sign That Actually Makes Sense
(After)

RESTAURANT | New Menus for Holiday Inn’s “The Hub”

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As Holiday Inn continues to revamp and revitalize their brand, they are clearly taking care of all of the details. With a new lobby concept that includes a restaurant, cafe and other amenities for guests, the hotel chain has elevated its menu design, as well.

With a classic color palette and simple layout, the menus for “The Hub”, as the lobby area is now called, are modern and eye-catching. Though, they aren’t flashy, the strategic use of typography makes the menus pleasant to peruse.

(Menu designs by Tom Cox)

*camille

Sauce

Sauce

PACKAGING | Dean & Deluca Private Label

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Dean & Deluca is one of those iconic, specialty brands that remains consistent in everything they do. From store design to the shopping experience, everything is straightforward, competent, and understated.The newest iteration in the Dean & Deluca private label packaging is unsurprisingly elegant and, naturally, mimics the hand-written labels used throughout its retail locations. The new designs let the products shine, providing the color and texture that completes the presentation. It all works together quite nicely.

*camille

COLOR + TYPOGRAPHY | Tucumen Wines

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The Tucumen brand of wine is the product of an Argentinean vineyard and represents the regions of Tucuman and Mendoza.

Appropriately, the design of the labels use a “patchwork” layout to convey the joining of two different areas of the country, while also applying color that brings to mind the vibrant Latin culture that is Argentina.

These features, along with the fun mix of font types, help the Tucumen brand stand out among its stuffier competitors on retail shelves.

*camille

PACKAGING | Miller64

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Apparently (I’m not really a beer-drinker), this is the re-introduction of Miller64 — a 64-calorie light beer option from MillerCoors. Regardless, of whether one is familiar with the product, this new identity is certainly eye-catching.

The subtle design details, crisp typography, and masculine color scheme (I love the rich grey blue!) bring a refreshingly modern aesthetic to the the beer world.

*camille